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Fortnite Players on PlayStation 4 Get 14.50 Update With Jetpacks, Improvements, Bug Fixes

first_imgThe update brings several bug fixes, including improvements for creators in Fortnite. They can now use up to 150 Channels on their Islands, the Button device now has an Interact Time option to slow activation, and Conditional Button device can be activated via Triggers remotely.In terms of big fixes for the island, the wind speed through grass has been reduced, issues with black glass tiles on PC in certain conditions has been sorted, and an issue with players unable to create a new island without changing the name of the island to its default has now been addressed.With the new update for Fortnite, the Creatures on the island can now navigate through doorways. They will also be able to navigate through copy/pasted player-built structures.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Other bug fixes include prefab and gallery bug fixes, new options to Score Manager device have been added, an alignment issue with the Princess Castle Archway Support has been fixed, and many more.Is OnePlus 8T the best ‘value flagship’ of 2020? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below. Fortnite players on PlayStation 4 have finally received the 14.50 update after some delay, the developers announced on Twitter. The popular game with a free-to-play battle royale mode was updated to version 14.50 on November 3 for all players, but PS4 players were left out due to some issues. Fortnite update 14.50 brings several bug fixes to the gameplay, along with new map locations, weapons, and more. Recently, developer Epic Games announced there is a next-gen version of the game that will be available for the PS5 and Xbox Series S/X consoles from Day 1.Fortnite update 14.50 detailsPlayStation 4 players now have access to update 14.50 after some delay, as tweeted by the developers. It was not revealed why there was a delay but the issue was sorted out quickly enough. It marks the end of Fortnightmares, the Halloween-based event in Fortnite. It also brings back Stark Jetpacks to the game.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

U.S. economy needs ‘really big’ Covid relief package, says Paul Krugman

first_imgKrugman, an economics professor at City University of New York’s Graduate Center, said it’s difficult to put a total price tag on an ideal relief package for the U.S. But he stressed that a “really, really big” one is needed given that the U.S. hasn’t managed to contain the virus.The economist, whose research interest includes macroeconomics and international economics, won the Nobel prize in 2008 for his analysis on trade patterns and location of economic activity. – Advertisement – “We’re still 11 million jobs down from where we were before this thing hit and all of those people are without wages, state local governments are in extreme financial distress, thousands of businesses — maybe hundreds of thousands — are on the verge of collapse,” he said.“So we need a lot to keep this thing afloat.”  The U.S. enacted a $2 trillion package known as the CARES Act in March, but those benefits have either expired or will soon end. Negotiations for another pandemic relief has been at an impasse for months after Republicans and Democrats failed to agree on what should be in the package.Democrats proposed another $2.2 trillion relief package that includes funding for state and local governments, as well as extending enhanced unemployment benefits of an additional $600 weekly subsidy. Republicans, meanwhile, wanted a smaller deal that would focus more on payment to individuals and business loans. Paul KrugmanNobel prize-winning economist A lot of people are going to be out of work, a lot of businesses are going to be stressed. We need to just make life tolerable for them.- Advertisement – The U.S. may need several hundred billion dollars a month in “disaster relief” to keep the economy afloat as a raging coronavirus outbreak continues to suppress prospects for workers and businesses, Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman said on Thursday.“We really are still very much in the disaster relief stage,” he told CNBC’s “Street Signs Asia.”“A lot of people are going to be out of work, a lot of businesses are going to be stressed. We need to just make life tolerable for them,” he added.- Advertisement – Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), who has won his reelection bid for a seventh term, said on Wednesday that the additional relief package will be his priority when the chamber reconvenes next week.Still, Krugman said there’s no indication that McConnell would agree to a large relief bill or extend enhanced unemployment benefits which have been the “most important policy” to cushion the pandemic’s economic impact.Republicans, he noted, viewed those benefits as “rewarding people for not working” and therefore, may not be inclined to renew that payout.“That was far more effective than anything else in the package, but we’ve seen very, very little … on the part of Senate Republicans to resume enhanced employment benefits,” he said. Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman.Panayiotis Tzamaros | ullstein bild via Getty Images – Advertisement –last_img read more

Trump’s efforts to undermine U.S. democracy make the news around the world

first_img– Advertisement – Germany’s Der Spiegel wrote that Trump was like a “late Roman emperor” who has “set a historic standard for voter contempt.””One can feel the anxiety for potential chaos seeing metal fences and security being hastily installed around the White House,” an editorial from a Hong Kong newspaper controlled by the Chinese government said. “The American election has became a global joke.”- Advertisement – And in Russia, a spokesman said President Vladimir Putin would hold “an international telephone conversation” on Thursday, but no further details were offered. last_img read more

Oisin Murphy confirmed as champion jockey once more | Racing News

first_imgHowever, the Jim Goldie-trained eight-year-old could manage only sixth place, forcing Buick to admit defeat in his gallant pursuit of a first jockeys’ championship. Oisin Murphy will officially be crowned Britain’s champion Flat jockey for a second time at Doncaster on Saturday after William Buick’s faint hopes of lifting the crown ended at Newcastle on Friday evening.Reigning champion Murphy signed off for the season with a double at Southwell on Tuesday to take his tally for the campaign to 142, after which he headed for Kentucky to ride The Lir Jet and Kameko at the Breeders’ Cup.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –center_img Buick closed the gap to nine with a winner at Kempton on Wednesday and a double at the same venue on Thursday – but his championship ambitions were dealt a major blow after Thursday’s card was abandoned after three races due to fog, meaning Buick missed four rides.With seven booked rides on the final afternoon at Doncaster on Saturday, Buick needed to steer home at least two winners from four mounts at Newcastle to keep the title race alive.After finishing fourth aboard Mustarrid in the first race and second on Frow in division one of the seven-furlong handicap, Buick was relying on Strong Steps to win division two to make a title win mathematically possible.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Gleb Savchenko’s Estranged Wife Elena Samodanova: 5 Things To Know

first_imgFollowing the separation announcement, Samodanova shared a cryptic post to Instagram that read: “I don’t hate you. I’m just disappointed you turned into everything you said you’d never be.”Throughout their now-strained marriage, Savchenko and Samodanova both led busy lives juggling parenthood alongside their careers. In 2017, the Gleb Collection designer shared how finding balance had benefitted their relationship.“We’ve danced together for more than 10 years and we’ve been married more than 10 years, so we learn how to separate work and home,” he told Entertainment Tonight at the time. “At work, [it’s] just a business. So, I’m very demanding. I ask a lot from her, she asks a lot from me, but when we’re at home, we are just happy [a] husband and wife who love each other.”- Advertisement – Dancing With the Stars fans are already quite familiar with who Gleb Savchenko is, but they may not be as well acquainted with his longtime wife, Elena Samodanova.Savchenko, 37, and Samodanova, 36, have been married since 2006. Together, the Russia natives share daughters, Olivia, 10, and Zlata, 3.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – Savchenko added, “We just enjoy each other’s company. That’s the secret, I think, and it’s been really successful so far.”Scroll through the gallery below to learn more about Samodanova. After being married for more than a decade, Us Weekly confirmed on November 6 that the couple have chosen to separate. “It is with a heavy heart that I tell you my wife and I are parting ways after 14 years of marriage,” he said in a statement to Us. “We still intend to coparent our wonderful children together who we love so dearly, and we will strive to continue to be the best parents that we can to them. We ask that you respect our family’s need for privacy and healing during this time.”The Dancing With the Stars pro also confirmed the upsetting news via Instagram, for which he shared the same statement and a photo of the now-estranged couple with their two daughters. Samodanova, for her part, addressed the breakup in her Instagram Story by noting that their “road is coming to an end.”- Advertisement –last_img read more

Coronavirus: No timeline for fans’ return to football stadiums | Football News

first_imgHowever, the former chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, Damian Collins MP, said that the Government “did not ask Netflix to bail out the arts”.Huddleston said: “(Julian Knight, MP for Solihull) said he believed it would be absurd for taxpayers money to be used to bail out or support elite football. I have to say I largely agree with him,” said Huddleston.“It is absolutely vital, and I have said this from the beginning, that football should look after itself – we mean at the elite levels.“The honourable member said there is enough money in football but it is poorly distributed. I’m afraid we are seeing that at this moment in time.“The idea that we should be using public money, our constituents’ money, to bail them out is just not acceptable. I appeal to them to come to a compromise as soon as possible.“I appeal to the EFL and Premier League to continue the very important conversations they are having.” Minister for Sport Nigel Huddleston has stated that it is the Government’s intention to see fans return to football stadiums “as soon as possible”.However, at a debate attended by ministers at Westminster Hall on Monday, Huddleston laid out no timeline for pilot events to resume or a date for a lifting of restrictions.- Advertisement – Jonathan Gullis, the Conservative MP for Stoke-on-Trent North, called the debate and stated: “As of December 2 I will be expecting to see an announcement that fans are coming back into football stadiums.”- Advertisement – Pressure is growing on the Government to allow supporters to return to football stadiums after coronavirus lockdown restrictions lift on December 2.Ministers debated the issue of supporters returning to grounds at all levels – which was intended to happen in October before Covid-19 cases began to rise once more – after a petition backed by the Premier League and Football League garnered nearly 200,000 signatures. “The Government does understand the financial implications of not allowing fans back into stadia from October 1 and we have worked tirelessly to get sports back up and running over the past few months, albeit behind closed doors. Premier League matches are being played in empty stadiumsImage:Premier League matches are being played in empty stadiums 2,500 fans watched Brighton's pre-season friendly against Chelsea on August 29Image:2,500 fans watched Brighton’s pre-season friendly against Chelsea on August 29 “Pilots were pivotal and have been very successful, they have been excellent learning points and learning opportunities. And that work has not been wasted as it is helping inform the decision-making process and we want to get pilots back and get fans back in stadia as soon as possible.“We have had a plan from very, very early on in the first lockdown and it has been explicitly stated and is out there, but what we have had to do on a couple of occasions, unfortunately, is press the pause button. But we want to get back to the plan as quickly as we can.“A big challenge we are facing, however, is how spectators travel to and from venues and how that might impact on transmission rates.“But we are committed to getting spectators back as soon as possible and we are working with the STIG (Sports Technology Innovation Group) group to analyse new technologies which might support the return of spectators.”Huddleston added that, when it came to financial support at the elite level, “football should be expected to look after itself”. – Advertisement – Huddleston replied that the Government are working “tirelessly” to try to achieve that but while conceding that transmission rates were low inside grounds due to them being open air, he said there remained issues around fans arriving at and gathering around stadia.“I am fully aware of the importance of getting fans back in stadia, not just for football but for all elite sports,” said Huddleston.“The point made by several members today that a one-size-fits-all approach may not be appropriate, and we are paying attention to what is happening in other countries.- Advertisement – Nigel Huddleston believes the Premier League can offer help to EFL clubs, amid the coronavirus pandemicImage:Minister for Sport Nigel Huddleston didn’t provide a timeline for the return of fanslast_img read more

Ant’s IPO is a ‘sign of the times’ and ‘not an isolated case’

first_imgI believe the Chinese government stepped in because they realized that they had to regulate these companies, so that they don’t … get too big. Ant operates Alipay, which is one of China’s most popular mobile payment systems. It is also provides everything from wealth management to micro loans, and sells financial technology to enterprises.But the fintech firm’s IPO, which would have been the biggest ever, was pulled at the last minute after Chinese authorities said there were “major issues” with the listing. “As you know, that sector in China has grown by leaps and bounds,” he said. “And now I believe the government is realizing that they cannot let this get out of control, because it’ll jeopardize the entire financial structure.”Changing world of paymentsSpeaking on the same panel, Douglas Flint, chairman of asset manager Standard Life Aberdeen, said the Ant IPO suspension indicated a need for central banks and regulators to have control of financial stability.He highlighted how many of today’s payments, money transmissions and investments had gone online.“While that is good for consumers and good for competition and good for lowering the cost of intermediation, I think that regulators and policymakers are beginning to get nervous given the scale of dominance that could happen,” he said. “I think there’s a financial stability issue that caused the cause the IPO to be pulled back.” The suspension of Ant Group’s initial public offering (IPO) is a sign of the times, according to veteran investor Mark Mobius, who is the founder of Mobius Capital Partners. Ant, an affiliate of Jack Ma’s Alibaba, was all set for a $34.4 billion dual listing in Shanghai and Hong Kong last Thursday.- Advertisement – While China appears to have concerns about some companies getting too big, it is keen to rapidly scale others in different industries.Fiona Frick, CEO of asset manager Unigestion, said on the same panel that China wanted to become “more independent” in certain sectors of tech, naming the semiconductor industry as one example.  Going forward, she said her firm was more positive on emerging markets, especially in Asia, than it was on Europe. “They’ve been managing their Covid crisis much better than us,” she said, adding that she’s particularly positive on tech in these countries.center_img – Advertisement – “The Chinese government is waking up to the fact that they cannot allow these companies that dominate a particular sector and particularly the financial sector,” said Mobius on a virtual panel at CNBC’s East Tech West conference.“I believe the Chinese government stepped in because they realized that they had to regulate these companies, so that they don’t … get too big,” he said, adding that other emerging markets have the same concerns. “A lot of it is related to privacy and other factors.”Asked if he thinks Ant is an isolated case, Mobius said “definitely not” and warned that the Chinese government may look to regulate the technology industry further.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

Jim Edmonds, Daughter Hayley Slam Meghan King Over Coronavirus

first_imgKing and Hayley’s rocky relationship was documented on RHOC. After the lifestyle blogger accused Jim of cheating on her with one of their nannies in October 2019, Hayley came to her dad’s defense. (Jim and the caretaker also denied the accusations.)“The selfishness is miserable for anyone to be around, let alone to be married to her,” Hayley told Us at the time. “My whole family has grown closer because we have all had to stay silent in hopes to protect my dad and no one can do it anymore.”While King and Jim continue to fight over custody of their daughter and sons, they have both moved on romantically. The former St. Louis Cardinals star has been seeing O’Connor since early 2020. King, for her part, confirmed in May that she is dating Christian Schauf after meeting on a dating app.Listen to Us Weekly’s Hot Hollywood as each week the editors of Us break down the hottest entertainment news stories! – Advertisement – The rep also claimed to TMZ that the blogger came to Jim’s home after being exposed to the virus and “was hugging and kissing the kids,” putting them and his girlfriend, Kortnie O’Connor, at risk.Jim Edmonds and Daughter Hayley Slam Meghan King for Coronavirus Diagnosis 1Jim Edmonds and daughter Hayley Courtesy of Hayley Edmonds/InstagramJim’s daughter Hayley Edmonds subsequently accused her former stepmother of knowingly exposing her and their family to the virus before she went public with her diagnosis on Sunday, November 15. (Jim and King, who split in October 2019 after five years of marriage, share daughter Aspen, 3, and 2-year-old twin boys Hayes and Hart.)“I have a question for you … I’m glad you can quarantine easily by yourself after exposing me, my dad, Kortnie, our nanny, [Hayley’s siblings] Landon, Sutton, and their home, brother and stepfather (oh and your own kids),” the 23-year-old wrote on Monday, November 16, via Instagram Stories. “But if you knew you were exposed on Tuesday what is your reasoning for insisting on taking Hayes to his soccer game and coming to our house on Saturday????”- Advertisement – It’s safe to say Jim Edmonds isn’t happy with his estranged wife, Meghan King, after she tested positive for coronavirus.The 50-year-old MLB alum’s rep accused the former Real Housewives of Orange County star, 36, of partying in Miami and not acting responsibly after learning she was exposed to COVID-19. Jim’s rep told Us Weekly on Monday, November 16, that the former athlete — who battled coronavirus in April — thinks King has a lot of “explaining to do” after she tested positive for coronavirus. The rep alleged King was partying in St. Louis and Miami. (Earlier this month, King posted photos without a mask in South Beach.)- Advertisement – Hayley, who tagged her dad and Kortnie in her Instagram Stories, went on to slam the former Bravo personality’s decision to accept clothes from “the awesome preschool community” for her three little ones that are currently staying at King’s parents’ home. (King wrote on social media on Monday that her family didn’t want to risk exposure to the virus by “gathering clothes” for the kids for their stay at their grandparents’ house.)Jim Edmonds and Daughter Hayley Slam Meghan King for Coronavirus Diagnosis 2Meghan King Michael Simon/startraksphoto.com“Don’t worry as long as you have clothing donations … because the kids are definitely in desperate need of that as opposed to families who cannot even afford to put clothes on their kids backs,” Hayley quipped.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Federal workers abroad urged to store food, water

first_imgEditor’s note: Shortly after publication of this story, the US Consulate in Hong Kong first changed and later removed its Web page advising employees to stockpile a 12-week supply of food and water. Nov 7, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – The US State Department is advising government employees overseas to stockpile enough food and water to last up to 12 weeks in preparation for the threat of a severe influenza pandemic.A Nov 3 statement posted on the Web site of the US Consulate General in Hong Kong and Macau said the State Department recently sent guidance on “shelter-in-place” or “self-quarantine” to all diplomatic and consular posts.The statement said that overseas employees, like their stateside counterparts and private citizens, should maintain supplies of food and water for a possible pandemic. The advisory urges families to store nonperishable foods that don’t require refrigeration, preparation, or cooking. Also, families are advised to store 1 gallon of water per person per day.The Hong Kong consulate also advises US citizens in Hong Kong and other countries to prepare for water supply disruptions if infrastructure breakdowns occur during an influenza pandemic.Suggested water purification techniques include boiling for at least 10 minutes and adding specified amounts of regular Clorox bleach.The recommendation that US citizens overseas stockpile 12 weeks’ worth of food and water differs from the current federal recommendation for general pandemic preparedness. The government, on its pandemic planning Web site, recommends that US residents stockpile 2 weeks’ worth of food and water.See also:PandemicFlu.gov article “A guide for individuals and families”http://www.flu.gov/individualfamily/familyguide.htmllast_img read more

Whose pandemic fatigue?

first_img(CIDRAP Source Weekly Briefing) – Far from being fatigued by pandemic warnings, the public is just beginning to hear the message. As planners, we’re the ones at risk of pandemic fatigue, as we slog our way forward.At CIDRAP’s “Business Preparedness for Pandemic Influenza Second National Summit” in Orlando this February, Editor-in-Chief Michael Osterholm used the term “pandemic fatigue.” Some in the audience understood him to mean that the public is getting tired of hearing about a possible future pandemic. But as Mike well knows, the public’s fatigue isn’t a significant problem yet. Our fatigue may be.Of course, the media suffer from periodic pandemic fatigue. If you don’t believe it, look at this graph of LexisNexis data showing general media coverage of H5N1.This isn’t an unusual-looking graph. Journalists are novelty junkies; they get bored fast. For a while, the risk of a pandemic was novelty enough for them. Then, inevitably, reporters started longing for a new angle. The one they found was: “Whatever happened to the risk of a pandemic?” That fueled some year-end stories. And it helped reporters gin up interest in otherwise run-of-the-mill January and February outbreaks, enabling them to report “Bird flu is back!” as if it had ever left.It’s a mistake to interpret the media’s cyclic boredom as the public’s fatigue.But those of us who are trying to arouse the public’s concern—and management’s concern—may be experiencing a bit of fatigue. I won’t speak for Mike, but I know I wouldn’t mind moving on to a different issue—if only we were further along on this one. I’ve talked to more than one health department planner and business continuity manager who expressed the same wish. It is a truism of mass communication that the source typically feels the message is getting old when the audience has barely begun to hear it. We should be careful not to project our own exhaustion onto the public.Which public are you addressing?The public, though, is really a lot of different publics. Here’s a quick-and-dirty audience segmentation analysis:Some are completely unaware. Far from being fatigued, they have yet to be reached at all.Some are aware, but haven’t really become interested yet. We just barely engaged them; we’ve got a toehold, nothing more.Some have given the issue real consideration, and now they’re digesting what they have learned. They may not be paying much attention at the moment, but when something new happens on the pandemic front, they’ll be interested again.Some are suffering from pandemic fatigue. They were interested; now they’re not.Some looked at the issue and decided we were wrong. They think H5N1 is a foolish distraction from more serious risks.Some have decided we’re right. They’ve even taken some pandemic preparedness steps. They’re converts and allies, and they’re hungry for more information.Some are active pandemic preppers and key information sources themselves for their neighbors and coworkers. They may see us as the laggards.We should be tracking the relative size of these groups much more carefully than we are. But my bet is that groups 2 and 3 are the biggies.It’s important to note that many in these two groups don’t understand the distinction between bird flu and pandemic flu. Some don’t know the word “pandemic” yet at all. Some who have learned the word think that the pandemic risk will come to them from birds. They are predisposed to overreact to diseased poultry and to underreact until diseased poultry are found nearby. And when news stories about bird flu outbreaks disappear for a while, it feels to them like the risk is gone. Some of what they’ve learned so far, in other words, is badly misleading.This pandemic audience segmentation, by the way, is grounded in Neil Weinstein’s precaution adoption process model, which lays out the stages any new risk goes through from ignorance to precaution taking. Weinstein’s main point is that the messages that work for people at one stage in the model are likely to be completely different from the messages that work for people at a different stage. As we try to figure out what people in groups 2 and 3 need to hear, it’s important not to confuse them with those in groups 4 and 5.Or even with each other. People in group 2, for example, almost certainly need to hear more about how bad a severe pandemic could be. People in group 3 may have heard as much of that as they need right now. Messages about what to do and why it can help might be a lot more useful in persuading them to bypass groups 4 and 5 and progress to 6.This audience segmentation is also consistent with what Anthony Downs has called the issue-attention cycle. When something happens that raises a new concern, people pay attention for a while. Their attention grows, peaks, and then falters. But it doesn’t retreat back to where it started. It settles into “the new normal,” a baseline level of awareness and attention higher than the previous baseline. The next time something happens, the public’s interest rises again, peaks again, and falters again.What follows is a series of peaks and valleys. The shape of this mountain range varies. It takes work and skill (and luck) to make sure the peaks keep getting higher, to build the public’s interest, concern, and willingness to act. What doesn’t vary is this: There are always valleys along the way.Slogging between teachable momentsI see four lessons here.Prepandemic communication—that is, pandemic precaution advocacy—happens most effectively in teachable moments. Sometimes you can create a teachable moment. Other times you need to wait, poised to strike, for the teachable moment.Between teachable moments, we have better things to do than bang our heads against the brick wall of public inattention. Keep up some baseline level of communication, so the issue doesn’t fall off the radar screen entirely. Other than that, focus on working with your fellow fanatics, the people who share your pandemic preoccupation (including those you successfully recruited during the last teachable moment). And focus on planning for the next teachable moment. What’s your plan for when H5N1 is found in North America? It will be a big teachable moment. Are you ready? And I don’t mean ready to reassure people about eating chicken. I mean ready to tell them about the real public health risk: a future pandemic.The pandemic audience is worth segmenting. Sometimes, like it or not, we’re stuck talking to everybody at once. But it’s often feasible to address different messages to the different audience segments. Knowing what each segment most needs to hear is a huge advantage.Pandemic preparedness is a slog. As Julie Gerberding, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said at CIDRAP’s Orlando conference, it isn’t a sprint, it’s a marathon. When the public’s attention periodically falters, we need to sustain our own. It normally takes about a generation to get a new risk or a new precaution firmly onto the public’s agenda: Think about seat belts, smoke alarms, and radon. Think about smoking. Think about global warming! In fact, a lot of activists on other risk issues are frankly envious of the fast progress made by pandemic preparedness advocacy since H5N1 came roaring back in late 2003.Stay on guardWe rightly think the progress isn’t nearly fast enough. We rightly worry that we may not have a generation to prepare. We should do everything we can to hurry the process along. And we should remember that it’s a slog, moderate our expectations, pace ourselves, and stay on guard against our own pandemic fatigue.An internationally renowned expert in risk communication and crisis communication, Peter Sandman speaks and consults widely on communication aspects of pandemic preparedness. Dr. Sandman, Deputy Editor, contributes an original column to CIDRAP Source Weekly Briefing every other week. Most of his risk communication writing is available without charge at the Peter Sandman Risk Communication Web Site, which includes an index of pandemic-related writing on the site.last_img read more